Research

The Zen of Nier: Automata — Tasting Reality in the Death of Meaning

The Zen of Nier: Automata — Tasting Reality in the Death of Meaning

What follows is devoid of spoilers for Nier: Automata. Instead, what I offer is an interpretive lens through which those who have yet to play the game, or who may have already done so, may interpret the narrative of Nier: Automata. This is, of course, only one possible reading among many others.

Ender’s Zero-Sum Game — Psychoanalyzing Andrew Wiggin

Ender’s Zero-Sum Game — Psychoanalyzing Andrew Wiggin

Thanks to some recommended reading from one of my sisters, I’ve come to read Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game in an entirely different light. In “Creating the Innocent Killer:Ender’s Game, Intention, and Morality,” John Kessel offers a fascinating reading of the moral ambivalence, and even potential immortality, of Card’s novel.

In Andrew “Ender” Wiggin, Kessel sees the construction of an ostensibly “innocent killer” merely; in other words, that Ender, though guilty of tremendous atrocities by the novel’s end, is written off as simply a product of his circumstances and thus justified rather than morally culpable. … After his own damning character analysis of Ender, Kessel concludes, “If I felt that Card’s fiction truly understood this, then I would not have written this essay.” …

That said, and I’m tempted to say that Radford and Kessel may likely agree, I am not yet prepared to toss all copies of Ender’s Game — and Card with them — onto the pyre, cultural or otherwise. Instead, rather than a zero-sum condemnation of Ender’s Game, I believe Radford and Kessel’s critiques offer readers an additional layer to Card’s novel — though not at all necessarily one Card himself may have noticed or even intended.

Martin Heidegger  —  in Brief

Martin Heidegger  —  in Brief

You will find here a 10 minute interview between philosopher Martin Heidegger and Thai monk Bhikku Maha Mani, conducted sometime in either n 1963 or 1964. I’m grateful for venues like YouTube for, among other things, providing individuals like myself an additional means by which to discover some of history’s most interesting thinkers.

The Psychology of Evangelion — On Falling in Love with Existence

The Psychology of Evangelion — On Falling in Love with Existence

With the recent release of Neon Genesis Evangelion on Netflix, as well as the anticipated conclusion of the Rebuild of Evangelion tetralogy in 2020, it seems fitting to dive back into the franchise as a whole and explore what it may have to offer viewers. Despite belonging to medium which has largely been overlooked or denigrated in the West, as far as anime is concerned, Neon Genesis Evangelion nonetheless contains a subtle yet substantial message about human psychological development, one as relevant now as when the series was originally aired in 1995.

"God Is Existence" — Thomas Keating, Thomas Metzinger, and the Contemplative Life

"God Is Existence" — Thomas Keating, Thomas Metzinger, and the Contemplative Life

I've been really enjoying the late Thomas Keating's The Human Condition, in which he describes psychological development through contemplation and meditation. Keating's work actually reminds me a great deal of modern leaps in neuroscience, especially as outlined by philosopher Thomas Metzinger in The Ego Tunnel: The Science of the Mind and the Myth of the Self. In this post, I compare Keating and Metzinger’s work in leading a contemplative life.

A Necessary Nihilism — Facing the Elephant in the Room with Ray Brassier

A Necessary Nihilism — Facing the Elephant in the Room with Ray Brassier

Ray Brassier may be the rightful heir to Friedrich Nietzsche's wrestle with nihilism, in no small part because I think Brassier possesses a far more articulate and considered version of nihilism than most.

The Rejected Sublime — Reading Terry Eagleton’s Radical Sacrifice

The Rejected Sublime — Reading Terry Eagleton’s Radical Sacrifice

Were I to review Terry Eagleton’s Radical Sacrifice, I would recommend it unequivocally. Though Eagleton and I may not see eye to eye in all things (and I would have it no other way; how else would I learn?), this latest addition to his bibliography is well worth the time of any reader interested in revolutionary politics, ideology, or even the Christian narrative itself. Rather than evaluate the merits of Eagleton’s work, I’ve instead experienced it for myself; and in lieu of a review, I have instead opted to share a stream of insights I gained from reading Radical Sacrifice.